Rescued dog turns out to be wolf

This+photo+taken+on+Thursday%2C+Feb.+21%2C+2019+and+released+by+the+Estonian+Union+for+the+Protection+of+Animals%2C+shows+an+approximately+one-year+old+male+wolf+suffering+from+shock+and+hypothermia+in+an+animal+shelter+near+Parnu+River%2C+Estonia.+Estonian+construction+workers+got+the+shock+of+their+lives+when+they+found+out+the+animal+they+saved+from+an+icy+river+was+not+a+dog+but+a+wolf.+%28Estonian+Union+for+the+Protection+of+Animals+via+AP%29

This photo taken on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019 and released by the Estonian Union for the Protection of Animals, shows an approximately one-year old male wolf suffering from shock and hypothermia in an animal shelter near Parnu River, Estonia. Estonian construction workers got the shock of their lives when they found out the animal they saved from an icy river was not a dog but a wolf. (Estonian Union for the Protection of Animals via AP)

Megan Wedhorn

Last week, Estonian construction workers rescued a young wolf from a frozen river in Estonia. The workers spotted, what they thought was a distressed dog in icy water while working on the Sindi dam on the Parnu River. Instead of leaving the animal there to freeze, the men cleared a path through the ice, pulled the canine from the water, loaded it in their car then drove it to a veterinary clinic.

When the workers arrived at the clinic, the canine was docile. However, veterinarians were a bit suspicious about the dog, because it was so large and weighted quite a bit. A hunter, familiar with the wolves in the area, confirmed that the dog was actually a one-year-old male wolf. The wolf was treated for low blood pressure, hypothermia, shock, and parasites, before being fitted with a GPS tracker and released back into the wild the following day.

Estonia is home to hundreds of wolves. However, the species usually avoid humans, so only a handful have ever been collared.